DISCOURSE


Authorship in a world
The writing in the community is bursting with activities inspiration and creativity. In a world is the representation of the language in a textual medium through the use of a set of signs or symbols. It is distinguished from the illustration and such as cave drawing, painting. Symbolic preservation of language via non-textual media, such as the magnetic tape audio. Authorship is an explicit way of assigning responsibility, Authorship practices should be judged by how honestly they reflect actual contributions to the final product an involved as well as to the strength and reputation of their institution. From the sound in the words the videos and the music, its could be take in from the images.
An all differ writing and differ ways tapes madeing a communising its will coming more an all the century’s. How the arties and designer their been a effecting them some how, in differed ways. Investigating other languages is intriguing. And continue to provide those who shape in the environment with the inspiration. Here we have the writer and journalist , film marker, Tarig ali, where he become involved in student politics, in particular with the movement against the war in Vietnam.

Philosophers and theorists
Philosophers and theorists is the general and fundamental problems and concerning matters such as existence, knowledge, values, mind, reason, and language. And it’s apart the practices and it’s about a empire and resistance, their human rights. To be counting in the history and were the rights and needs. The empire dialogues lessons of the history limits. It’s speaking in Edmonton and this only wants a words places, and for world’s pest. And the theorists become involved in students politics in particular with the movement against the war in Vietnam. On the graduating is led the Vietnam solidarity campaign. Commonly defined as a process that brings together cognitive, emotional, and environmental influences and experiences for acquiring, enhancing, or making changes in one’s knowledge, skills, values, and world views and really the system produces a process which allows it to inhibit personal freedom without really feeling that this is what is going on. The person doesn’t feel that something arbitrary is being done to him which is in fact what is happening.

Core values
The core values the best at the accountability and balance, collaboration. It’s more like something in the middle in inside you. It’s bigger what you think? It’s the value in you. And the Commitment to roll great product, service and other initiatives that impact lives both within and outside the organization. And the Community as well, Innovation to come out with new creative ideas that have the potential to change the world. And to be an Integrity to act with honesty and integrity without compromising the truth. Quality Giving the best and unmatched results for all round satisfaction there some problems. And the globalization it’s the fast Commines from the online, news papers TV; it’s the biggest and the fatties in this century.

Clarity and minimalism
The minimalism and modernisism is an a movements in various forms of art and design, the clarity makes everything’s in so clearly in design, in differing tapes bluing’s and interior. What there thinking of? How did thinking’s? And there where the work is stripped down to its most fundamental features. As a specific movement in the arts it is identified with developments in post World War II Western Art. I want to talk about De stijl the style was the name given to the work of the architects, designers and artists associated with the magazine of the same title edited by Theo van does burg and founded in Holland in 1917.and even with the Bauhaus and the Russian constructivists at helped create the ideology and formal language of modernism. A stripping down of the traditional forms of architecture, furniture, painting or sculpture into simple basic geometric components and elements. The composition from these separate elements of formal configurations which are perceived as wholes while remaining clearly constructed from individual and independent elements. An insistence on the social role of art, design and architecture. A belief in a balance between the universal and collective and the specific and individual. And utopian faiths in the transforming qualities of the mechanization and new technology, conviction that art and design have the power to change the future and also the lives and life styles of individuals.

DALI
I most say after all Picasso, Salvador Dali is probably the most universally in world famous, which is not to say the most highly regarded, twentieth century painter.
Not least among the reasons for this was his talent, extraneous to his abilities as a painter, for publicity. He has been frequently identified with surrealism, and to a large extent even determined its popular image, yet he was eventually rejected by the movement itself and his most celebrated painting, at least in England, Christ of sit John of the cross, is fundamentally opposed to surrealism in spirit. And something about his painting when you looking sometime, its makes you to sit an hours to look at it some reason. I mean that when really you in love in something you put all the forces about what you really love. And you will do what ever it will takes reaming how to work hard to get it. You have to be like a shark to search for something and take it. To be like Dali or not even close to him but, that how really you love something like Dali. And Cause me believing in my self some how all cause of for him.

RICHARD HOLLIS
It’s about to cinematic to your self so the people will can you do. The it’s really brings ups new ideas. What really can do? What their thinking of, when their look at something’s or their background of and their something nature in them. Talking about Richard Hollis one of the bigness designers in graphic in century at all the time.
Richard Hollis he is one a former freelance graphic designer and worked as a printer and art editor production manager teacher and lecturer. He studied art and typography at the Chelsea, Wimbledon and central school of art, London.
From 1958 he taught lithography and design art the London college of printing and Chelsea school of art, before working in Paris in the early 1960s from 1964 to 1967 he was head of the graphic design department at the west of England college of art, Bristol, and was for six years senior lecturer at the central school of art design.
And sometime when I see one of his works, i am thinking what he saw or what he did see on his mind. Every each work he done, you can see the message of all each work he done.

Typography in films 1980s
The 1980s saw the continued rise of the blockbuster an increased amount of nudity in film and the increasing emphasis in the American industry on film franchises, especially in the science fiction, horror and action genres. Much of the reliance on these effect-driven blockbusters was due in part to the star wars films at the advent of this decade and the new cinematic effects it helped to pioneer. And if looking at all the 80s movie title and the posters you will see how it’s so differ each poster, titles and its makes you to look at the poster not like now. All the movies in this century all just minimalism and don’t have a lot in the posters. But in 1980s you can see a lot things going on by you seen the write and how their put the star’s in the covers, by you looking at it you can tell whose the bad guy and the good guy. The colours and the typography on it.

Animation
Around almost from the very beginning of cinema and at the hands of such superb pioneers as Winsor mccay, max Fleischer and of course Walt Disney had proved a crowd pleasing spectacle for cinema audiences. So it is surprising that it was not until 1937, well into the sound film era, that the first full length cartoon film appeared. Yet for Disney it was a costly gamble, tying up his studio and hundreds of craftsmen who might other wise have been engaged on profitable short subjects.
Snow white and the seven dwarfs (1937) was a watershed in animation.
To make it, groundbreaking techniques had to be invented, illuminating the way for countless features ever since most produced by Disney, among them fantasia (1941) dumbo (1941) and bambi (1942).
Other studios particularly warner with bugs bunny and M.G.M with tom and jerry, had developed their own short subject production lines and as television viewing escalated and old film going habits and programming died, skills were transferred to the new medium and lost along the way since the voracious appetite of that new medium led to some diminished quality.
Apart from the occasional full length Disney feature animation on the big screen felt like rather a missed opportunity at least until the late 1980s when who framed roger rabbit (1988) and the little mermaid (1989) seemed to rekindle old delights.
A new burst of animated features followed and in recent times some of the most innovative have come from non English speaking markets Belleville rendezvous (2002).
From France or the likes of Akira (1988) and spirited a way (2002) from Japan.
The most important development, however was that of computer generated imagery (CGI) initially used to create extra ordinary special effects in films such as terminator 2; judgement day and Jurassic park (1993).
Disney collaborated with pixar to produce toy story (1995) the first feature wholly created by CGI and an outstanding hit.
A bugs life (1998) and toy story 2 (1999) followed but Disney was at last to en counter powerful competiton fromother producers especially dream works, whose shrek (2001) lit up the box office. Pixar’s massive 2004 hit the incredible took the technique to new heights.

Face book
Face book is my personal assistant, allowing me to catch up on my social life without telephone tag, awkward lunches and five, ten-fifteen year reunions. We write on each others wall, a message board, when we want to say happy birthday without singing into an answering machine. When I’m having a hectic week at my university works I can change my status so that people know why I haven’t returned their telephone calls? Much better than wasting time calling people to tell them you’re too busy to talk. As summer days passed and friend requests poured in, it didn’t matter that id never met these people, because soon we’d be in touch together. As face book grew up alongside us, it improved our collective social lives? All friends of mine and counting. I can’t go to a sorority formal or football game without photos from the event winding up on face book, uploaded by me or a friend. Sure it may be overly indulgent and some of the pictures are unflattering, but this constant chronicling of life eliminates the secret diary or crafty scrapbook, before face book, I may have written some words in my journal about some subjects, now my friends and I are building each others collective stories one photo, caption and poke at a time.

Google
How much did I use Google? Apparently a lot more often than even I could wonder. For the last two weeks, I’ve had google.com blocked at both university and home. The amount of data they’re gathering on me is frights tuning, not because I’m positive the government will legislate their way into Google’s database sooner or later and start labelling people as suspicious. Let us look at the fact here, life on the internet without using Google is hard I’m not going to lie; life without Google has been hell online. I initially wanted to give Ask.com a chance as my primary search engine. I like their interface and I like where they’re going. The problem I encountered is that the search results just aren’t good enough. I’m lucky if I can find what I’m looking for 50% of the time. Despite what their advanced search page says, if you search for something in quotations, it doesn’t mean that it will search, I wasn’t impressed for too long. And in 2004, the net worth of both individuals was a reported US$4 billion, tying them with each other as the 43rd richest Americans. The following year, their wealth grew to $11 billion each.

Film director
Film directors are responsible for overseeing creative aspects of a film. They often develop the vision for a film and carry the vision out, deciding how the film should look. and how to makes new ideas so you can get trow the people,to see whole new look. They also direct what tone it should have and what an audience should gain from the cinematic experience. Directing a film is a kind of storytelling. Film directors are responsible for approving camera angles,lens effects,lighting , and set design, and will often take part in hiring key crew members. They coordinate the actors’ moves and also may be involved in the writing, financing , and editing of a film.
all this to trying to get the magess trowing by the directors,to break this away to undersantd what its coming from,mabay from his past,the stories in really life.
sometimes you dont get what the director what trying what their say,but after the movie done all makes secne,by the watch the movie.

Arabic typographer
I had the chance to travel to some Arabic countries where I discovered the beauty of calligraphy as building or object ornamentation. However, I’ve been wondering how this free style could be transposed into movable types or glyphs. Well, after doing a little research I can say that I’ve not been disappointed by Arabic or Persian designers and font creators. There are some amazing talents in the Middle-East and it’s a sad thing that we don’t know much about them in the western world.
As you can see on the above picture, movable types for Arabic languages look just as cool as Latin ones and must be just as painful to use.
.Adapting Latin fonts
One big challenge for Arab typographers is to adapt some Latin fonts. This is important in order to offer a wider catalogue of fonts for graphic designers. I wonder if we do that the other way around and adapt Arab fonts to Latin.
How to integrate Arabic Calligraphy into modern design layouts?
In the past few years the Arabic calligraphy was a comeback into modern logotypes and contemporary design layouts. That was mostly due to the international awareness of the Iranian calligraphic and typographic work. While most Arabic nation (especially Lebanon) were neglecting the Arabic calligraphy and preferring computerized Arabic fonts instead, Iranian typographers embraced the calligraphic heritage and incorporated the calligraphy into modern typographic layouts.
ARABIC
Arabic is an international language reaching millions of people worldwide. Boutros International, headed by Mourad and Arleta Boutros, has led the field of Arabic creativity, typography, calligraphy and design for more than 40 years. Since 1966, Boutros International has focused on meeting the latest technological requirements and the creative needs of the Arabic speaking world. Its designers and technical experts are consistently at the forefront of new developments. Working globally, projects have ranged from the creation of Arabic typeface collections for internationally renowned software and design houses to corporate Arabic logotypes and private commissions.
Successful results are founded on balancing strategic thinking with contemporary Arabic designs and typefaces. Boutros International experts regularly lecture on Arabic typography at top international seminars, as well as providing typographic consultancy services to many international organisations.

The Golden Years of Egyptian Film
cairo cinema 1936-1967
A film from the Golden Age of Egyptian cinema. True love will not come easy for the lovers in this wonderful farrago of songs, sinister villains, false accusations of fraud at the architect’s office, attempted murder and final happiness. A wonderful romp through the times when Egypt was modernising at breaknerck speed with nary a burka in sight.
Between the 1930s and the 1960s, the Egyptian cinema industry was at its height, producing hundreds of black-and-white comedies, dramas, and romances, many of which became enduring classics, much loved and watched over and over throughout the Arab world in cinemas and on television. Whatever the genre, love was always a central theme-ideal love, impossible love, love won, love lost.

Here in this sumptuous, large-format treatment, film fan Sherif Boraie has gathered over a hundred promotional stills from more than eighty great Egyptian movies. In glorious black-and-white, stars who are household names from Casablanca to Baghdad pucker or pout, cower or scowl, clinch or croon, scheme or triumph. There are the divas and the crooners: Umm Kulthum, Laila Murad, Abd al-Halim Hafez, Farid al-Atrash; the leading ladies: Faten Hamama, Suad Husni; the leading men: Omar Sharif, Rushdi Abaza; the dancers: Naima Akif, Tahiya Carioca; the villains: Tawfiq al- Diqn, Mahmoud al-Meligui; and the comics: Mary Munib, Isma’il Yasin. Not to mention the child star Fayruz, the people’s hero Farid Shawqi, and the magnificent Hind Rustum.

Research about the arties

Steven Spielberg
Steven Allan Spielberg is an American film director and screenwriter, film producer.. In a career spanning over four decades, Spielberg’s films have taken up many themes and genres. Spielberg’s early science fiction and adventure were seen as an archetype of modern Hollywood blockbuster, filmmaking. In later years, his films began addressing such issues as the holocaust, slavery, war and terrorism.
Spielberg won the Academy award for best director for Schindler’s list (1993) and saving Private Ryan (1998). Three of Spielberg’s films -JAWS (1975), E.T. THE Extra terrestrial (1982) and Jurassic park (1993) – achieved box office records, each becoming the highest-grossing film made at the time. To date, the unadjusted gross of all Spielberg-directed films exceeds $8.5 billion worldwide.
Career
His first professional TV job came when he was hired to do one of the segments for the 1969 pilot episode of night gallery. The segment, “Eyes,” starred Joan Crawford, and she and Spielberg were reportedly close friends until her death. The episode is unusual in his body of work, in that the camerawork is more highly stylized than his later, more “mature” films. After this, and an episode of Marcus welby, M.D., Spielberg got his first feature-length assignment: an episode of the name of the game called “L.A.2017” This futuristic science fiction episode impressed Universal Studios and they signed him to a short contract. He did another segment on Night Gallery and did some work for shows such as Owen marshall; counselor at law and The Psychiatrist before landing the first series episode of columbo (previous episodes were actually TV films).
Based on the strength of his work, Universal signed Spielberg to do four TV films. The first was a Richard matheson adaptation called duel about a monstrous tanker truck which tries to run a small car off the road. Special praise of this film by the influential British critic dilys Powell was highly significant to Spielberg’s career. Another TV film (something evil) was made and released to capitalize on the popularity of the Exorcist, then a major best-selling book which had not yet been released as a film. He fulfilled his contract by directing the TV film length pilot of a show called Savage, starring martin landau. Spielberg’s debut theatrical feature film was the sugarland express, about a married couple who are chased by police as the couple tries to regain custody of their baby. Spielberg’s cinematography for the police chase was praised by reviewers, and the Hollywood reporter stated that “a major new director is on the horizon.” However, the film fared poorly at the box office and received a limited release.
Studio producers richard zanuck and david brown offered Spielberg the director’s chair for Jaws, a horror film based on the peter benchley novel about an enormous killer-shark. Spielberg has often referred to the grueling shoot as his professional crucible. Despite the film’s ultimate, enormous success, it was nearly shut down due to delays and budget over-runs.
But Spielberg persevered and finished the film. It was an enormous hit, winning three Academy awards (for editing, original score and sound) and grossing $470,653,000 worldwide at the box office. It also set the domestic record for box office gross, leading to what the press described as “Jawsmania.” Jaws made him a household name, as well as one of America’s youngest multi-millionaires, and allowed Spielberg a great deal of autonomy for his future projects. It was nominated for Best Picture and featured Spielberg’s first of three collaborations with actor Richard dreyfuss.
Keith Haring
Keith Haring was an artist and social activist whose work responded to the new yourk city street culture of the 1980s. Born in reading, Pennsylvania, Haring grew up in kutztown and was interested in art from an early age. From 1976 to 1978 he studied graphic design at The Ivy School of Professional Art, a commercial and fine art school in pittsburgh.At age 19 Haring, who was openly gay, moved to New York City, where he was inspired by graffiti art, and studied at the school of visual arts.
Haring achieved his first public attention with chalk drawings in the subways of New York (see public art). The exhibitions were filmed by the photographer tseng kwong chi. around this time; “The Radiant baby” became his symbol. His bold lines, vivid colors, and active figures carry strong messages of life and unity. Starting in 1980, he organized exhibitions in club 57. He participated in the Times Square Exhibition and drew, for the first time, animals and human faces. In 1981 he sketched his first chalk drawings on black paper and painted plastic, metal and found objects.
Haring contributed to the New York New Wave display in 1981, and had his first exclusive exhibition in the tony shafrazi Gallery. That same year, Haring took part in Documenta 7 in Kassel, Germany. By 1982, he established friendships with fellow emerging artist’s futura 2000, Kenny scharf, Madonna and jean Michel basquiat. He took part in the Whitney biennial in 1983, as well as in the Sao Paulo biennial. He got to know Andy Warhol, who was the theme of several of Haring’s pieces including “Andy Mouse.” His friendship with Warhol would prove to be a decisive element in his eventual success, particularly after their deaths.
Claes Oldenburg
he worked as a reporter at the city news bureau of chicago . He also opened his own studio and, in 1953, became a naturalized citizen of the United States. His first recorded sales of artworks were at the 57th Street Art Fair in Chicago, where he sold 5 items for a total price of $25 He moved back to New York City in 1956. There he met a number of artists, including Jim Dine, Red Grooms, and Allan Kaprow, who’s Happenings incorporated theatrical aspects and provided an alternative to the abstract expressionism that had come to dominate much of the art scene.
The most memorable aspects of Oldenburg’s works are perhaps, the colossal sculptures that he has made. Sculptures, though quite large, often have interactive capabilities. One such interactive early sculpture was a soft sculpture of a tube of lipstick which would deflate unless a participant re-pumped air into it. In 1974, this sculpture, Lipstick (Ascending) on Caterpillar Tracks, was redesigned in a sturdier aluminum form, the giant lipstick being placed vertically atop tank treads. Originally installed in Beinecke Plaza at Yale, it now resides in the Morse College courtyard.

Abram games
The style of his work refined but vigorous compared to the work of contemporaries has earned him a place in the pantheon of the best of 20th-century graphic designers. In acknowledging his power as a propagandist, he claimed, “I wind the spring and the public, in looking at the poster, will have that spring released in its mind.” Because of the length of his career over six decades his work is essentially a record of the era’s social history. Some of Britain’s most iconic images include those by Games. An example is the “Join the ATS” propaganda poster of 1941, nicknamed the “Blonde Bombshell” recruitment poster. From 1942, during World War II, Games’s service as the Official War Artist resulted in 100 or so posters. 1946, he resumed his freelance practice and worked for clients such Shell, Financial Times, Guinness, British Airways, London Transport, El Al and the United Nations. He designed stamps for Britain, Jersey, and Israel. Also, he designed the logo for JFS situated currently in

North-west London. There were also book jackets for Penguin Booksand logos for the 1951 Festival of Britain (winning the 1948 competition) and the 1965 Queen’s Awad to Industry Evidence of his pioneering contributions is the first (1953) moving on-screen symbol of BBC Television. 1946-53, Games was a visiting lecturer in graphic design at London’s Royal College of Art, 1958, was awarded the Order of the British Empire(OBE) for services to graphic design; 1959, was appointed a Royal Designer for Industry (RDI). In the 1950s and of Jewishheritage, he was known to have spent some time in Israel where, among other activities, he designed stamps for the Israeli Post Office and taught a course in postage-stamp design.
James Jarvis
Inspired by classic cartoons like Tin tin and Popeye, the British illustrator JAMES JARVIS (1970-) has created his own three-dimensional casts of characters as the World of Pain and In-Crowd plastic toys. He also invents imaginary worlds for his characters each of whom has their own role and personality.
When James Jarvis dreamed up a group of bikers as a new collection of the plastic In-Crowd characters he designs for the toy company Amos, he pictured them as “reasonable, sound, sane, wise, balanced, rational, sagacious, prudent, judicious and level-headed”. He even invented a club for these do-good bikers – the Forever Sensible Motorcycle Club.
The members of the Forever Sensible Motorcycle Club, like the musicians in Ages of Metal, his next In-Crowd characters, stem from the drawings that Jarvis has created since childhood. He was inspired to start drawing by his love of illustrated books such as Tint in, Rupert the Bear and The Tale of Peter the Rabbit. Born in London in 1970, Jarvis went on to study illustration at the University of Brighton and then at the Royal College of Art in London.
Grayson perry
The English artist, known mainly for his ceramic vases and cross-dressing. He works in several media. Perry’s vases have classical forms and are decorated in bright colours, depicting subjects at odds with their attractive appearance, child abuse and sado-masochism. There is a strong autobiographical element in his work, in which images of Perry as “Claire”, his female alter-ego, often appear. He was awarded the Turner Prize in 2003 for his ceramics, receiving the prize dressed as Claire.
Ricky swallows
He creates painstakingly detailed pieces and installations in a variety of media, often utilising objects of everyday life as well as the body (bones etc). He first came to national prominence in Australia when he won the prestigious Contempora 5 Prize in Melbourne at the age of 25 in 1999. He was later selected to be the Australian representative at the 2005 Venice Biennale with This Time another Year.Swallow is well known for his careful craftsmanship and conceptual ideas in his works in relation to the contemporary society. His works are described as models, miniatures, replicas, copies, dioramas, homages, mementos, monuments and simulacra.
Peter Brooke
The English cartoonist who has produced work for numerous publications, including Radio Times, New Society, New Statesman, The Spectator and most notably The Times, for which he is the leader-page cartoonist. Brookes has worked for a range of publications, including New Society (which used one of his cartoons as a cover illustration in 1968) and the Radio Times. In the mid-1970s he replaced Chris Achilleos as regular jacket illustrator for Doctor Who novelisations from Target Books but his cartoon-style artwork proved less popular than Achilleos’s more naturalistic style and he completed only four covers. He had a short stint as a political cartoonist for the New Statesman, before returning to academia and lecturing at the Central School of Art and the Royal College of Art. For a time he worked as cover artist for the Spectator but, in 1992, he moved to the Times, as its leader-page cartoonist.
Fergadelic
Fergus Purcell (a.k.a. Fergadelic) and the decade hasn’t stopped influencing him since. The iconic, hyper literal designs and logos he’s created for Silas, Hysteric Glamour, X-Girl Japan, and his own Tonite label often combine the stoner aesthetics of prog rock and classic metal with a subversive sense of humor that seems straight from the pages of Robert Crumb and Viz comics. Purcell’s signature style is dictated by thematic elements skulls, sci-fi, skate iconography, music-related graphics but it isn’t dominated by just one technique,pen and ink drawings, hard edged vector graphics, photo realist airbrushing, and collage all find their way into his work.
Will Bankhead
Will Bankhead’s designs for Honest Jons. 37 and 38. Cover and inside spread from London Is ihe Place for me no. 2 (2005). Cover photograph: Charlie Phillips, 1960s. Inside cover photograph of Brixton Market, ca. 1964, by Vat Wilmer. 39. UF UP YUH Leg A Trample (2004). Cover photograph by Will Sankhead. 40. Ambrose Jidekoya Campbell, London Is the Place for Me ‘ 3 (2006). Cover image: detail from a publicity photo In the Val Wilmer archive.
Daniel eatock
Daniel Eatock is the artist who made the Big Brother eye. He was nominated for the Brit Insurance Designs of the Year award. Eatock is interested in connections between image and language, titles, punch lines, miscommunication, subversions, open systems, contributions from others, seriality, collections, discovery and inventing. He employs reductive logic, and strives for objective and rational solutions to form concluded works. While eatock produces work for clients such as the
New York Times, and Britain’s channel 4 many of his pieces / projects are self initiated. from fruit bowls
covered in fruit stickers, to letraset markers being left
to bleed onto paper for a month – these are just a few
of the explorative works that have steadily helped
eatock’s concepts find their way from his website
to art galleries.
Paul brazier
Paul has spent the last 16 years at AMV after stints at WCRS and cogent. During that time he’s won numerous awards including D&AD pencils, one show and Cannes gold lions. He was made executive creative director in 2005. he was appointed joint executive creative director of McCann in January 2006, and immediately implemented a cunning plan that placed creative excellence at the heart of the agency. As a result, McCann London is enjoying its best ever year for awards. They have even won a D&AD pencil.
Gina geoghead
The artis gina geoghead she current a Film maker and editor at Imagine, graphic designer at imagine,film maker at materials library, film project at 2008 WOLF ram,student at chelsea college of art and design and artistic adviser at 2008 J&B commercial. And gina geoghead she a specialties with adobe photoshop, illustrator and Indesign, film and video production, final cut pro, photography, directing, editing and set design, interior design, book and magazine design, art direction.
The glue society
The glue society is a creative collective based in Sydney and New York comprising writers, designers, art directors and film directors. Established in 1998 by Gary freedman and Jonathan Kneebone, the glue society’s work encompasses everything from broadcast entertainment, commercials, print advertising, graphic design and books to art exhibitions, live events, installations and sculpture. The glue society was recently awarded hot shop of the year by Australian creative magazine and has been included in the top international director’s issues of creativity magazine and boards magazines in the us in 2007 and 2008. Their work has received numerous advertising industry accolades in recent years gold awards at the one show and at the clio awards in the us, yellow pencils at D&AD in the uk and gold, grand prix and titanium awards at the cannes advertising festival.
JONATHAN BARNBROOK is one of the UK’s most active graphic designers. Pioneering the notion of graphic design with a social conscience, Barn brook makes strong statements about corporate culture, consumerism, war and international politics. Working in both commercial and non-commercial spheres, Barn brook combines originality, wit, political savvy and bitter irony in equal measures.
Founding his studio in 1990 and Virus Foundry in 1997, Barn brook is perhaps best known for his provocatively named fonts, such as Mason (originally released as Manson), Except, Bastard, Prozac, Nixon and Drone. The controversy surrounding this work stems from its subversive nature and strong social commentary. Barn brook multi layers meaning and style – working with language and letterforms in an ingenious way. He uses advertising to reveal anti-corporate messages and exhibitions to promote non-commercial work. With an international presence and local impact, Barn brook’s work is definitely of the times.
Since graduating in graphic design from Saint Martin’s School of Art and the Royal College of Art in London, Barn brook has developed a multifaceted practice which includes graphic design, typeface design and motion graphics. He has worked with clients as diverse as Damien Hirst and anti-corporate collective Ad busters.
William Seward Burroughs
Was an American novelist, essayist, social critic, painter and spoken word performer. Much of Burroughs’s work is semi-autobiographical, drawn from his experiences as an opiate addict, a condition that marked the last fifty years of his life. A primary member of the Beat Generation, he was an avant-garde author who affected popular culture as well as literature. In 1975, he was elected to the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters.
John War wicker
Design Company Tomato was founded in 1991 in London by John War wicker, Steve Baker, Dirk Van Doreen, Karl Hyde, Richard Smith, Simon Taylor and Graham Wood. In 1994, Michael Horsham and Jason Kedgely joined.
Tomato specializes in: Architectural Design, Consultancy, Drawing, Education, Electronic Interactive Media, Film & Commercial Direction, Graphic Design, Fashion, Motion Graphics, Music & Sound, Strategy, Branding & Identity, Photography, Publishing, Title Sequences, Typography, and Writing. In 1997, tomato interactive was formed with Tom Roope, Anthony Rogers and Joel Baumann. Tota Hasagawa joined in 2001 when tomato and tomato interactive became one and the same.
Baumann has since become Professor of Interactive Media and Communication at Kassel University in Germany and is still a member of tomato. Roope is a lecturer of Interactive Media Studies at the Royal College of Art in London.
Currently, tomato has studios in London, New York, Tokyo and Melbourne.
Edward Fella
Ed Fella is an artist, educator and graphic designer whose work has had an important influence on contemporary typography. He practiced professionally as a commercial artist in Detroit for 30 years before receiving an MFA in Design from the Cran brook Academy of Art in 1987. He has since devoted his time to teaching at the California Institute for the Arts and his own unique self-published work which has appeared in many design publications and anthologies. In 1997 he received the Chrysler Award and in 1999 an Honorary Doctorate from CCS in Detroit. His work is in the National Design Museum and MOMA in New York. His recently published book Edward Fella: Letters on America, Photographs and Lettering gives insight into his idiosyncratic world by combining and juxtaposing examples of his unique hand lettering with his photographs of found vernacular lettering.
Martin Venezky
Since its publication earlier this year, Martin Venezky’s It is beautiful…then gone has met with scant (any?) critical review. With few surveys of this kind being published, every release seems worthy of examination. Significant questions are still being asked about the monograph’s role in design and differing approaches to the form.

That It is beautiful…then gone has kept below the radar is unfortunate but, in its own way, in keeping with Venezky’s work. With its oblique origin (he proposed a book on his teaching) lack of hyperbole, and discreet scale, IIBTG seems to deliberately defray attention. In its non-intuitive way (for design), the book demonstrates why Venezky is a distinctive figure in the field. And it’s not for the reasons you’d expect.
Luke Hayman
Hayman’s wide-ranging expertise encompasses the design of magazines, books, identities and exhibitions. He has served as the design director of I.D. magazine; senior partner and associate creative director in the Brand Integration Group (BIG) at Ogilvy & Mather, New York; creative director for Media Central and Brill’s Content magazine; and creative director of Travel + Leisure magazine. In 2004 Luke joined New York magazine as design director. Working alongside Editor-in-chief Adam Moss, he was instrumental in restoring the title to prominence.
Since joining Pentagram, Hayman has redesigned numerous publications including TIME, Consumer Reports, Communications of the ACM, The Atlantic and the Khaleej Times, a broadsheet newspaper in Dubai. He has designed identities for Kagan, the New York Photo Festival, the World Science Festival, the White House Historical Association, and the Outward Bound Center for Peace building and the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art.
Hanif Kureishi
Hanif Kureishi is an English playwright, screenwriter and filmmaker, novelist and short story writer. The themes of his work have touched on topics of race, nationalism, immigration, and sexuality. In 2008, The Times named Kureishi in their list of “The 50 greatest British writers since 1945”.
JONATHAN BARNBROOK is one of the UK’s most active graphic designers. Pioneering the notion of graphic design with a social conscience, Barnbrook makes strong statements about corporate culture, consumerism, war and international politics. Working in both commercial and non-commercial spheres, Barnbrook combines originality, wit, political savvy and bitter irony in equal measures.
Founding his studio in 1990 and Virus Foundry in 1997, Barnbrook is perhaps best known for his provocatively named fonts, such as Mason (originally released as Manson), Exocet, Bastard, Prozac, Nixon and Drone. The controversy surrounding this work stems from its subversive nature and strong social commentary. Barnbrook multi layers meaning and style – working with language and letterforms in an ingenious way. He uses advertising to reveal anti-corporate messages and exhibitions to promote non-commercial work. With an international presence and local impact, Barnbrook’s work is definitely of the times.
Since graduating in graphic design from Saint Martin’s School of Art and the Royal College of Art in London, Barnbrook has developed a multifaceted practice which includes graphic design, typeface design and motion graphics. He has worked with clients as diverse as Damien Hirst and anti-corporate collective Adbusters.
William Seward Burroughs
Was an American novelist, essayist, social critic, painter and spoken word performer. Much of Burroughs’s work is semi-autobiographical, drawn from his experiences as an opiate addict, a condition that marked the last fifty years of his life. A primary member of the Beat Generation, he was an avant-garde author who affected popular culture as well as literature. In 1975, he was elected to the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters.
John War wicker
Design Company Tomato was founded in 1991 in London by John War wicker, Steve Baker, Dirk Van Dooren, Karl Hyde, Richard Smith, Simon Taylor and Graham Wood. In 1994, Michael Horsham and Jason Kedgely joined.
Tomato specializes in: Architectural Design, Consultancy, Drawing, Education, Electronic Interactive Media, Film & Commercial Direction, Graphic Design, Fashion, Motion Graphics, Music & Sound, Strategy, Branding & Identity, Photography, Publishing, Title Sequences, Typography, and Writing. In 1997, tomato interactive was formed with Tom Roope, Anthony Rogers and Joel Baumann. Tota Hasagawa joined in 2001 when tomato and tomato interactive became one and the same.
Baumann has since become Professor of Interactive Media and Communication at Kassel University in Germany and is still a member of tomato. Roope is a lecturer of Interactive Media Studies at the Royal College of Art in London.
Currently, tomato has studios in London, New York, Tokyo and Melbourne.
Edward Fella
Ed Fella is an artist, educator and graphic designer whose work has had an important influence on contemporary typography. He practiced professionally as a commercial artist in Detroit for 30 years before receiving an MFA in Design from the Cranbrook Academy of Art in 1987. He has since devoted his time to teaching at the California Institute for the Arts and his own unique self-published work which has appeared in many design publications and anthologies. In 1997 he received the Chrysler Award and in 1999 and Honorary Doctorate from CCS in Detroit. His work is in the National Design Museum and MOMA in New York. His recently published book Edward Fell: Letters on America, Photographs and Lettering gives insight into his idiosyncratic world by combining and juxtaposing examples of his unique hand lettering with his photographs of found vernacular lettering.
Martin Venezky
Since its publication earlier this year, Martin Venezky’s It is beautiful…then gone has met with scant (any?) critical review. With few surveys of this kind being published, every release seems worthy of examination. Significant questions are still being asked about the monograph’s role in design and differing approaches to the form.

That It is beautiful…then gone has kept below the radar is unfortunate but, in its own way, in keeping with Venezky’s work. With its oblique origin (he proposed a book on his teaching), lack of hyperbole, and discreet scale, IIBTG seems to deliberately defray attention. In its non-intuitive way (for design), the book demonstrates why Venezky is a distinctive figure in the field. And it’s not for the reasons you’d expect.
Luke Hayman
Hayman’s wide-ranging expertise encompasses the design of magazines, books, identities and exhibitions. He has served as the design director of I.D. magazine; senior partner and associate creative director in the Brand Integration Group (BIG) at Ogilvy & Mather, New York; creative director for Media Central and Brill’s Content magazine; and creative director of Travel + Leisure magazine. In 2004 Luke joined New York magazine as design director. Working alongside Editor-in-chief Adam Moss, he was instrumental in restoring the title to prominence.
Since joining Pentagram, Hayman has redesigned numerous publications including TIME, Consumer Reports, Communications of the ACM, The Atlantic and the Khaleej Times, a broadsheet newspaper in Dubai. He has designed identities for Kagan, the New York Photo Festival, the World Science Festival, the White House Historical Association, and the Outward Bound Center for Peace building and the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art.
Hanif Kureishi
Hanif Kureishi is an English playwright, screenwriter and filmmaker, novelist and short story writer. The themes of his work have touched on topics of race, nationalism, immigration, and sexuality. In 2008, The Times named Kureishi in their list of “The 50 greatest British writers since 1945”.
Jan Morris Career
Jan Morris served in World War II in the 9th Queen’s Royal Lancers, and later wrote for The Times. As a correspondent for The Times, Morris scored a notable scoop in 1953 when accompanying the British expedition which was first to scale Mount Everest. Morris reported the success of Hillary and Tenzing in a coded message to the newspaper, “Snow conditions bad stop advanced base abandoned yesterday stop awaiting improvement”, and by happy coincidence the news was released on the morning of Queen Elizabeth’s coronation.
Jan Morris
Is a British historian, author and travel writer. She is known particularly for the Pox Britannica trilogy, a history of the British Empire, and for portraits of cities, notably Oxford, Venice, Trieste, Hong Kong, and New York City, and has also written about Wales, Spanish history and culture. With an English mother and Welsh father, Morris was educated at Lancing College, West Sussex, and Christ Church, Oxford, but now considers herself Welsh. A gender re-assigned woman, she was published under her former name, “James Morris” until the 1970s. Morris served in World War II in the 9th Queen’s Royal Lancers, and later wrote for The Times. As a correspondent for The Times, Morris scored a notable scoop in 1953 when accompanying the British expedition which was first to scale Mount Everest. Morris reported the success of Hillary and Ten zing in a coded message to the newspaper, “Snow conditions bad stop advanced base abandoned yesterday stop awaiting improvement”, and by happy coincidence the news was released on the morning of Queen Elizabeth’s coronation. Reporting from Cyprus on the Suez Crisis for The Manchester Guardian in 1956, Morris produced the first “irrefutable proof” of collusion between France and Israel in the invasion of Egyptian territory, interviewing French Air Force pilots who confirmed that they had been in action in support of Israeli forces.
Italy Calvino
Italian journalist and writer of short stories and novels. His best known works include the Our Ancestors trilogy (1952-1959), the Cosmicomics collection of short stories (1965), and the novels Invisible Cities (1972) and If on a winter’s night a traveler (1979).
Lionised in Britain and America, he was the most-translated contemporary Italian writer at the time of his death, and a noted contender for the Nobel Prize for Literature
Vittorini’s death in 1966 greatly affected Calvino. He went through what he called an “intellectual depression”, which the writer himself described as an important passage in his life: “…I ceased to be young. Perhaps it’s a metabolic process, something that comes with age, I’d been young for a long time, perhaps too long, suddenly I felt that I had to begin my old age, yes, old age, perhaps with the hope of prolonging it by beginning it early.
Christopher William Bradshaw Isherwood
Was an English novelist. Bachardy became a successful draughtsman with an independent reputation, and his portraits of the dying Isherwood became well-known after Isherwood’s death. At the age of 81, Isherwood died in 1986 in Santa Monica, California from prostate cancer. Their lifelong relationship is chronicled in the film Chris & Don: A Love Story.
Isherwood’s collection of stories Goodbye to Berlin provided the inspiration for the play I Am a Camera, the subsequent Broadway musical Cabaret and the film of the same name.
A memorial plaque to Isherwood was erected on the house in Schoenberg, Berlin, where he lived.
A Single Man was adapted into a film of the same name in 2009.
Bruce Chatwin
Chatwin is admired for his spare, lapidary style and his innate story-telling abilities. However, he has also been criticised for his fictionalised anecdotes of real people, places, and events. Frequently, the people he wrote about recognised themselves and did not always appreciate his distortions of their culture and behaviour. Chatwin was philosophical about what he saw as an unavoidable dilemma, arguing that his portrayals were not intended to be faithful representations. As his biographer Nicholas Shakespeare argues: “He tells not a half truth, but a truth and a half.” The novel follows the fortunes of Kaspar Utz who lives in Czechoslovakia during the Cold War. Utz is a collector of Meissen porcelain and finds way to travel outside the eastern bloc to acquire new pieces. Whilst in the West Utz often considers defecting but he would be unable to take his collection with him and so, a prisoner of his collection he is unable to leave.
Audrey Hepburn
Breakfast at Tiffany’s is a novella by Truman Capote published, along with three of his short stories, in book form by Random House in 1958. The same year the novella appeared unabridged in the November issue of Esquire. The novella’s prose style prompted Norman Mailer to call Capote “the most perfect writer of my generation,” adding that he “would not have changed two words in Breakfast at Tiffany’s”.
The heroine of Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Holly Go lightly, became one of Capote’s best-known creations and a cultural icon. Capote himself acknowledged that Go lightly was the favorite of his characters. The film Breakfast at Tiffany’s, based on the novella and starring Audrey Hepburn, was released in 1961.
Eugene At get
Was a French photographer noted for his photographs documenting the architecture and street scenes of Paris? At get finally settled in Paris in the 1890s. Despite his limited background in the visual arts, he saw photography as a source of income, selling his photographs to artists in the nearby town of Montparnasse. He advertised his photographs as “documents for artists.” It was common practice at the time for painters to paint scenes from photographs. By the mid-1890s, At get bought his first camera and began to photograph more than 10,000 images of the people and sights of the French capital. By 1899, he had moved to Montparnasse, where he lived and earned a modest income until his death in 1927.

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